Introducing Several Great Hymn Writers

Philip Paul Bliss

blissphilippaul3.jpg P. P. Bliss (1838-1876) was an American hymn writer and Gospel singer who wrote the words and music for such hymns as “Almost Persuaded,” “Hallelujah, What a Saviour!,” and “Let the Lower Lights Be Burning.”

0723brad.jpgWilliam Batchelder Bradbury Wm. B. Bradbury (1816-1868) was an American composer of Gospel songs and hymns. He wrote the music for such familiar hymns as “He Leadeth Me,” Holy Bible, Book Divine,” “Jesus Loves Me,” “Just As I Am,” “Saviour Like a Shepherd Lead Us,” “Sweet Hour of Prayer,” and “The Solid Rock.”

crosby_fj_1872.jpg

Fanny Crosby Frances Jane “Fanny” Crosby (1820-1915) was an American hymn writer and poetess, who wrote over 8,000 hymns during her life. One time a preacher sympathetically remarked, “I think it is a great pity that the Master did not give you sight when He showered so many other gifts upon you.” She replied quickly, “Do you know that if at birth I had been able to make one petition, it would have been that I should be born blind?” “Why?” asked the surprised clergyman. “Because when I get to heaven, the first face that shall ever gladden my sight will be that of my Savior!”

cush3r.jpgWilliam Orcutt Cushing W. O. Cushing (1823-1902) was an American minister and hymn writer. After the death of his wife in 1870 and with declining health, he retired from the ministry and began writing hymns. He wrote over 300 hymns, including “Under His Wings ,” “When He Cometh ,” “Ring the Bells of Heaven”, “Follow On,” and “Hiding in Thee.”

cwesley3-11.jpgCharles Wesley Charles Wesley (1707-1788) was an English hymn writer, poet, and preacher who wrote over 5,500 hymns including “And Can It Be That I Should Gain?,” “O for a Thousands Tongue to Sing,” and “Hark! the Herald Angels Sing.”

doane3.jpgWilliam H. Doane William Howard Doane (1832-1915) was an American composer, editor of hymn books, businessman and inventor. Composed over 2000 tunes, many for the hymns and Gospel songs written by Fanny Crosby, including “Rescue the Perishing,” “I Am Thine, O Lord,” “Near the Cross,” and “Safe in the Arms of Jesus.”

excell_eo.jpgEdwin Othello Excell E. O. Excell (1851-1921) was an American composer of hymns and music director. Composed the music for the hymn “Count Your Blessings,” and both the words and music for “Since I Have Been Redeemed.” Worked with evangelists Sam Jones (for two decades) and Gipsy Smith.

haver2r.jpgFrances Ridley Havergal Frances Ridley Havergal (1836-1879) was an English poet and hymn writer. Began writing verse at age of seven. Her most widely known hymn is “Take My Life and Let It Be.” Also wrote the words for “Like A River Glorious,” “I Gave My Life for Thee,” and “Who Is on the Lord’s Side?” She published several volumes of poems and hymns as well as prose writings.

hoffm1r.jpgElisha Albright Hoffman Elisha Hoffman (1839-1929) was an American minister and Gospel song and hymn writer who wrote the words and music for such familiar hymns as “Are You Washed in the Blood?,” “I Must Tell Jesus,” “Is Your All on the Altar?,” and “What a Wonderful Saviour!”

129.jpgWilliam James Kirkpatrick Wm. J. Kirkpatrick (1838-1921) was an American sacred music composer and publisher. He wrote the music for such familiar hymns as “Lead Me to Calvary,” Jesus Saves!,” “Tis So Sweet to Trust in Jesus,” “We Have an Anchor,” “Redeemed,” and “Meet Me There.” With John R. Sweney, he published over eighty Gospel song collections during a period of seventeen years.

lowry.jpgRobert Lowry Robert Lowry (1826-1899) was an American, Baptist minister and gospel song and hymn writer who wrote the words and music for such familiar hymns as “Shall We Gather at the River?,” “Nothing But the Blood,” and “Christ Arose!” As music editor for Biglow & Main, he jointly edited over a dozen books of gospel songs and hymns.

mcgran1r.jpgJames McGranahan James McGranahan (1840-1907) was an American Gospel song and hymn writer. Wrote the music for such familiar hymns as “Christ Returneth!,” “There Shall Be Showers of Blessing,” and “The Banner of the Cross,” and both the words and music for “Verily, Verily,” and “Go Ye into All the World.” Edited fifteen hymn books. Singing evangelist with Major D. W. Whittle for eleven years.

140.jpgIra David Sankey Ira D. Sankey (1840-1908) was an American Gospel singer and composer of music for such hymns as “Faith Is the Victory,” “Trusting Jesus,” and “Under His Wings.” Associate with D.L. Moody in evangelistic work in the U.S. and abroad as solo singer/music director.

141.jpgGeorge Coles Stebbins George Stebbins (1846-1945) was an American Gospel hymn writer who composed the music for such familiar hymns as “There Is a Green Hill Far Away,” “Ye Must Be Born Again ,” “Take Time To Be Holy,” “Have Thine Own Way, Lord!” and “Saved by Grace.”

towner2.jpgDaniel B. Towner Daniel Brink Towner (1850-1919) was an American Gospel music composer and teacher. In 1885, entered full-time evangelistic work and was associated with D. L. Moody, L. W. Munhall, Major D. W. Whittle and others. Music director at Moody Bible Institute from 1893 to 1919. Composed over 2000 hymns tunes, including the music for “Trust and Obey,” Anywhere With Jesus,” “Saved By the Blood,” and “At Calvary.”

whittsr3.jpgDaniel Webster Whittle Major Daniel Webster Whittle (1840-1901) was an American evangelist, Bible teacher and hymn writer. Through the influence of D. L. Moody, he entered full-time evangelism and worked with P.P. Bliss and James McGranahan. He wrote (mostly under pseudonym, El Nathan) the words for about two hundred hymns, including “Moment by Moment,” “I Know Whom I Have Believed,” and “Banner of the Cross.”

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